Super Tuesday: A Look at Blue Collar Workers

Thursday, March 01, 2012

On Super Tuesday, 437 delegates are up for grabs, and just like in Michigan, America’s blue collar workers are going to play an important role especially in three of the main battleground states: Ohio, Tennessee and Georgia. But who are these workers, what are their industries, and what message do they want to hear from their potential presidential nominee?

John Zogby, Senior Analyst of the polling firm JZ Analytics, explains the importance of blue collar workers.

Guests:

John Zogby

Produced by:

Hsi-Chang Lin

Comments [2]

When I listen to the major candidates talk I see between the lines and they are actually saying, "The people are revolting!"

I think about it. The people ask to be given jobs and access a doctor when they need it and their money's worth of safety and security and demand clean air/water/land and their boss' company to be left alone and subsidies for their farms and control over their woman's reproductive organs and their beliefs to be held about other beliefs. And it dawned on me that I agree with those candidates: the People ARE revolting. They stink on ice.

Mar. 01 2012 09:19 AM
Charles

John Zogby made a statement that as a Mormon, a vote for Mitt Romney might be "anathema" to Catholic blue-collar voters. Zogby apparently isn't aware of the exit polling data from Michigan, which showed that Romney had a significant margin of victory among all Catholic voters.

http://thecaucus.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/02/29/catholic-vote-costs-santorum-in-michigan/

Both John Zogby and Celeste Headlee also seemed to be ignorant of other polling datat which shows that as political groups Democrats are much more likely to be prejudiced to vote against a Mormon candidate based on religion than are Republicans.

http://washingtonexaminer.com/politics/2011/06/anti-mormon-bias-persists-notably-among-democrats/115623

Basically, all that this interview seemed to do was to allow Celeste Headlee to try to confirm all of her prejudices about polling data.

Mar. 01 2012 08:26 AM

Leave a Comment

Register for your own account so you can vote on comments, save your favorites, and more. Learn more.
Please stay on topic, be civil, and be brief.
Email addresses are never displayed, but they are required to confirm your comments. Names are displayed with all comments. We reserve the right to edit any comments posted on this site. Please read the Comment Guidelines before posting. By leaving a comment, you agree to New York Public Radio's Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use.