Marco Rubio's Mormon Past Comes to Light

Friday, February 24, 2012

Marco Rubio is surrounded by supporters as he makes a campaign appearance outside an early voting location on October 20, 2010 in Miami, Florida. (Joe Raedle/Getty)

Senator Marco Rubio generated a lot of positive buzz at this year's Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in January. A dynamic young catholic Latino from Florida, Rubio charmed crowds with his sense of humor and looked like he could be the perfect young vice-presidential candidate. However, on Thursday BuzzFeed broke the story that Rubio was, for a few years of his life, Mormon.

With an evangelical Christian base that have had no issue voicing their displeasure with the other Mormon candidates during this election cycle, Rubio's fall from the GOP may have already taken place.

Steve Kornacki writes about politics at Salon.

Guests:

Steve Kornacki

Produced by:

Mythili Rao

Comments [2]

Charles

Too bad that Marco Rubio's teen religious practices were as a Mormon. If only he'd been a Muslim instead, he'd have been immunized to any criticism from the lefties at Salon by the old story in which the Hillary Clinton campaign had leaked the photo of a teen Obama in Kenyan tribal dress:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-518585/Obama-turban-Barack-accuses-Hillary-smear-campaign-circulating-photos-dressed-Muslim.html

Can't we just be honest about the fact that Steve Kornacki and Salon basically work as an anti-Republican oppo-research team? It is confusing to your listeners when you introduce him as a journalist, at something called "Salon." Salon makes it sound like it is an online newsmagazine.

Feb. 24 2012 04:57 PM
listener

The biased media run a story about a Republican's religion which will cause the Republican to respond which lead to a new round of discussions about it which will lead to cackling "journalists" with an agenda sputtering about how Republicans are obsessed with religion.

Rinse, dry repeat until November.

Feb. 24 2012 09:34 AM

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