New Collection of Essays Detail the 'Secret Love Lives' of American-Muslim Women

Tuesday, February 14, 2012

Be it about wearing the veil or their general place in society, discussion in the West about Muslim women — especially those conducted by non-Muslims — tend to portray them as silent, oppressed, and submissive victims. However, a new book titled "Love, InshAllah: The Secret Love Lives of American Muslim Women" reveals the diverse and sometimes unconventional experiences of Muslim-American women in sex and romance. 

Ayesha Mattu and Nura Maznavi are co-authors of "Love Inshallah: The Secret Love Lives of American Muslim Women."

Guests:

Ayesha Mattu and Nura Maznavi

Comments [1]

Rachel from New York

Thank you for continuing to cover a vast array of human interest stories. This story was particularly interesting to me. I am a social worker and have an increasing number of Muslim families come to the clinic where I work (developmental disabilities/behavior problems of children). I must admit that I often feel a bit blind working with this population because of the lack of information about some beliefs and the insulation of the cultural aspects (marriage, love, child rearing). I hope that more books, articles and interviews enter the discussion in the near future so that we may all better understand each other and so people who want to help those in need may feel more capable to do so.

Feb. 14 2012 09:20 AM

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