President Obama Sends 2013 Budget to Congress

Monday, February 13, 2012

President Barack Obama makes remarks on the economy at a fire station in Arlington, Virginia. (Getty)

Monday morning, President Obama sends Congress his 2013 budget plan. The president’s budget includes stimulus-style spending increases on highway construction projects, schools, and other public works. It also includes increased taxes for wealthy Americans and corporations. What it doesn’t include are significant cuts, and the president already getting push-back from Republicans about his plan. They say it avoids making needed sacrifices and that it doesn’t do enough to curb the deficit or keep the rapid growth of benefit programs like Medicare in check.

To help take a better look at the numbers, and the politics, behind the president’s budget, Takeaway Washington correspondent Todd Zwillich joins the program.

Guests:

Todd Zwillich

Produced by:

Mythili Rao

Comments [1]

listener

"You can't have everything" was not exactly on the minds of those who voted for Obama in 2008.
How did we go from "Yes We Can" to "No You Can't"?

The Pelosi Congress did not pass a budget.
The Reid Senate did not pass a budget in over 1000 days.
Obama's budget was rejected in the US Senate 97-0.
They all are responsible for trillions in new spending with no way to pay for it.
Is that compromise or deliberately sabotaging the system and then blaming the system for political effect.

"This is a broad statement of governing philosophy" or in other words putting ideology and politics over the vital interests of the nation in order to placate his extremist base and keep political power for himself.

"We have been "coming out of a recession" for three years and the Democratic Party leadership is not serious about governing. They are serious about spending on muddled and half baked projects to pander to segments of the voting public and the partisan media shamelessly gives them cover in this expensive deception.

Feb. 13 2012 09:21 AM

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