Notes from the Conservative Political Action Conference

Friday, February 10, 2012

Herman Cain addresses the annual Conservative Political Action Conference. (Win McNamee/Getty)

The 39th annual Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) began on Thursday with speeches from Jim DeMint, Stephen Halbrook, Michele Bachmann, Anne Coulter, and President Eisenhower’s granddaughter Susan Eisenhower, among others. With invocations of Reagan and cries for party unity, the three-day event could help give focus to what has been a lukewarm GOP race.

Todd Zwillich, Takeaway Washington correspondent, reports on the division among conservative voters when it comes to supporting Mitt Romney.

Guests:

Todd Zwillich

Produced by:

Mythili Rao

Comments [3]

listener

CPAC "It is a rowdy, crowed loud event" unlike the law abiding, civil and sanitary Occupy events?

Listening to public radio's analysis of CPAC is like asking a vegan to suggest a good steakhouse.

Feb. 10 2012 03:48 PM
Jessie Henshaw from way uptown

No doubt, the key to vicious verbal attack is to get those being attacked to endlessly repeat the distortion, as compelling and news worthy and requiring "equal time".

Maybe just asking "how do you know?" instead of passing it on, and more frequently preceding highly prejudiced labels with "so called" would be more sensible.

Feb. 10 2012 08:15 AM
Elaine

I listened to this story, including your use of the term "pro-life." PLEASE could you update your style guide, as EVERY OTHER MAJOR NEWS ORGANIZATION has done, to eliminate that term? I don't really know anyone who is not "pro-life." I do know people who are "anti-abortion," or "anti-abortion rights," which have become the preferred terms. Come join us in the 21st century.

Feb. 10 2012 06:32 AM

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