Obama's State of the Campaign Address

Tuesday, January 24, 2012

US President Barack Obama disembarks from Air Force One at the JFK Airport in New York on January 19, 2012. Obama arrived in New York to attend campaign events. (JEWEL SAMAD/Getty)

Tuesday night’s state of the union address will be a prime-time assessment of the nation's policy, economy and infrastructure and a laundry list of Administration policy goals set for the future. It will also serve as the opening salvo to President Obama’s 2012 reelection campaign. To look at the State of the Union as prime time electioneering is Julian Zelizer, professor of history and public affairs at Princeton University.

Guests:

Julian Zelizer

Produced by:

Hsi-Chang Lin

Comments [3]

Every time an elected official speaks in public, it's part of a campaign. Every time. That's what they do.

Jan. 24 2012 11:39 AM
listener

Obama's campaign does not begin with this State of the Union address tonight but the special Joint Session of Congress speech back in September after he returned from his luxury Cape Cod vacation and his million dollar bus campaign tour..ALL of which was paid for by the US tax payer.

President Obama's special Joint Session of Congress address was clearly a political campaign speech.
President Bush called a special Joint Session of Congress address ten years earlier after the 9/11 attacks.

Was the the Bush speech needed and appropriate and was the Obama speech a crass and "unseemly" abuse of the trappings of Presidential power for personal ambition?

Jan. 24 2012 10:48 AM
Steve from White Plains, NY

I would discuss the economic disintegration of the middle class as a result of Republican tax and economic policies and how the President's jobs proposal of rebuilding the infrastructure of our country, turned down by the Republicans, is a big start to rebuilding the economic status of middle class.

Jan. 24 2012 06:30 AM

Leave a Comment

Register for your own account so you can vote on comments, save your favorites, and more. Learn more.
Please stay on topic, be civil, and be brief.
Email addresses are never displayed, but they are required to confirm your comments. Names are displayed with all comments. We reserve the right to edit any comments posted on this site. Please read the Comment Guidelines before posting. By leaving a comment, you agree to New York Public Radio's Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use.