What's Ahead for China in the Year of the Dragon?

Monday, January 23, 2012

Monday marks the beginning of 4709 in the Chinese calendar, the "Year of the Dragon". A strong, fiery, and auspicious cultural symbol, the lunar year ahead holds the potential for seismic change. In addition to the generational transitions set for its government, military, and the Communist Party, some experts are claiming 2012 will be the year China's economy collapses.

Sheryl WuDunn, author of "China Wakes: The Struggle for the Soul of a Rising Power." She and her husband, New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof, also co-authored the book, "Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide."

Guests:

Sheryl WuDunn

Produced by:

Hsi-Chang Lin

Comments [2]

Brian Mosher

I'm not familiar with the work of the guest you had in this segment, but based on the title, it sounds like a serious academic book. Which makes me wonder why you wasted her time and ours by talking about astrology?

Jan. 23 2012 10:48 AM
Ed from Larchmont

What we want to see this year is a significant move in the defense of human life. Today is the March for Life in Washington and we now have many laws around the country making people think about what abortion is before they choose it. The other day was the March for Life in San Francisco and they are starting a March for Life in St. Louis. Like slavery, this gross moral evil will be destroyed, or it will destroy the country.

Also note that the administration, this pro-abortion administration, on Friday reaffirmed its intention to make everyone pay for contraception and abortifacient contraception in the health care insurance plans, regardless of their religious beliefs. This is a serious breach of freedom of conscience that needs everyone's attention.

Jan. 23 2012 06:08 AM

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