A World Without Wikipedia

Wednesday, January 18, 2012

The anti piracy laws being considered in the U.S. have produced worldwide internet turmoil. Perhaps you are already aware that the giant Wikipedia website in English is down not because of some pirates, but in protest to what the Wikipedia people think this would do to the internet. Well Wikipedia's message today is that we in the 21st century world community need the open architecture of the internet and sites like Wikipedia. Just check out what it is like suddenly not to have them.

Produced by:

Jay Cowit

Comments [4]

You know who should've blacked out their websites? Artists and actors. Our freedom of speech is the ONLY reason they have their fame and fortune. In the old days they would've been minstrels and jesters in a monarch's court - and then they'd be un-date-able.

Jan. 20 2012 10:32 AM
Jay Cowit

http://www.thetakeaway.org/2012/jan/17/controversial-bill-could-endanger-internet-security/

we interviewed two opponents of the bill on yesterday's show. Check out the interview here, and expect more coverage this week and next. Thanks!

Jan. 18 2012 06:47 PM
listener

Apparently there was time for this cartoonish montage but no time to hear from those opposed the bill. Why?

Regardless of the issue, a simple, tasteful, legal and effective form of protest is mocked today yet the disgusting and criminal display that was the Occupy protest is lavished with praise. Why?

Jan. 18 2012 09:34 AM
clive betters

well,that's assuming that wikepedia does not do it's own censoring,or at the very least,allow others to censor. ie. try getting comprehensive good info on alternative medicine, on wikipedia,you can't. there are 'info-scubbers", from the FDA and pharma, that have free rampant reign there.

Jan. 18 2012 08:29 AM

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