Where Do Bachmann Supporters Go From Here?

Thursday, January 05, 2012

Republican presidential candidate U.S. Rep. Michele Bachmann (R-MN) speaks to a Town Hall meeting held at the Principal Financial Group December 29, 2011 in Des Moines, Iowa. (Getty)

Despite only carrying five percent of the vote in the GOP caucus, Michele Bachmann rallied a base of evangelical supporters and successfully cultivated an image of political outsider looking to clean up Washington. Now that she's out of the race, her supporters could widen the divide between GOP hopefuls. With two other candidates who are outspoken about their evangelical religious views and Paul's platform of returning to conservative ideals, there is no short supply of alternatives for former Bachmann-boosters.

Brad Cranston, Pastor of Heritage Baptist Church and member of Iowa Baptists for Biblical Values Location, and Shelly Kennedy, member of the Bayshore Tea Party, are both long-time Bachmann supporters. They join the program to discuss their plans for the rest of the presidential race.

Guests:

Brad Cranston and Shelly Kennedy

Produced by:

Mythili Rao

Comments [2]

Andrew from America

Women should just stay home and vacuum.

Jan. 09 2012 11:03 PM
kristen carlberg from glen ridge nj

I must say, i laughed to myself when, in the course of discussing the cultural obstacles for women in higher office, john hockenberry referred to Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher (not once, but twice) as "maggie". Really, john? When you talk about Churchill do you refer to him as "Winnie"? THis so perfectly illustrated EXACTLY the cultural obstacle that women face: a fundamentally less respectful/serious attitude towards women. period.

Jan. 05 2012 08:52 AM

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