A Look at the GOP Field Before the Iowa Caucus

Tuesday, December 27, 2011

Republican presidential hopeful Newt Gingrich. (Jim Watson/Getty)

The Iowa caucus is a week away, and it seems that Mitt Romney, Newt Gingrich, and Ron Paul are the front-runners for taking this crucial victory. Yet none of them have a distinct lead. Recently revealed newsletters that Paul published in the 80s and 90s contained racist, anti-Semitic, and anti-gay messages. Gingrich recently failed to qualify for the Republican primary in Virginia after he could not get the 10,000 valid signatures necessary to be placed on the ballot. And Romney, despite remaining near the top of the polls over the past few months, has never been able to distinguish himself as a front-runner.

Maggie Haberman, senior political writer for Politico, discusses what to look for in the time leading up to Iowa. Also joining the conversation is Jon Ward, senior political reporter for The Huffington Post.

Guests:

Maggie Haberman and Jon Ward

Produced by:

Ben Gottlieb

Comments [1]

They are all clowns. Just going through the motions to make it look like an election. As long as the GOP is so clearly for the 1%, and Obama for the 99% it's hardly an election worth having. The "stonewalling strategy" that was supposed to make Obama look bad has backfired as the American people slowly realize now who the real enemy is. Favorbility polls for Congress and Obama confirm this. The recently elected Tea Party newbies simply made a bad situation worse.
But it's "news", so I suppose we have to sit through it. Besides, GOP lovers have to have a game-board on which to play "Let's Pretend."

Dec. 27 2011 12:35 PM

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