EU Court to Rule on Carbon Emissions

Wednesday, December 21, 2011

(Chris Murphy/flickr)

On Wednesday, the European Union's highest court will rule on a lawsuit filed two years ago by two U.S. airlines and a industry trade association attempting to halt the E.U.'s plan to charge for carbon emissions pollution. It would include the industry in the worldwide cap and trade market. If the court decides to uphold the 2008 European law, on January 1, airlines will be forced to reduce their carbon emissions to an historic low, or buy emission credits from companies that pollute less than the base rate.  

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and 42 other countries have been outspoken in their opposition and have asked the EU to halt its cap and trade plan.

Michael Boyd is president of the Boyd Group, an aviation consultancy firm in Evergreen Colorado. As a spokesman for the industry, Boyd says the plan will hurt business and not help the environment. Annie Petsonk is International Counsel at the Environmental Defense Fund. She is a proponent of the plan.

Guests:

Michael Boyd and Annie Petsonk

Comments [1]

While I don't agree that taxes on carbon emissions will fix much because the cost is just transferred to the consumer who has little control on the affected industries, I do agree it's a moot argument because Europe can make rules that benefit Europe.

However, I don't agree with Michael Boyd who says humans pollute anyways and it's a too much of an imposition to do something about it. That's the mentality of the boomer generation that got us in this situation. We should clean our output as much as what we input. Sooner or later, it all comes back to us.

Dec. 21 2011 09:51 AM

Leave a Comment

Register for your own account so you can vote on comments, save your favorites, and more. Learn more.
Please stay on topic, be civil, and be brief.
Email addresses are never displayed, but they are required to confirm your comments. Names are displayed with all comments. We reserve the right to edit any comments posted on this site. Please read the Comment Guidelines before posting. By leaving a comment, you agree to New York Public Radio's Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use.