Fifth Day of Violent Clashes in Tahrir Square

Tuesday, December 20, 2011

An Egyptian protester's sign reads: '(Field Marshal) Tantawi, get your dogs off me' and depicts a veiled woman who was beaten by military police, during a demonstration at Tahrir Square on Dec. 19. (MOHAMMED ABED/AFP/Getty Images/Getty)

Egyptian security forces attempted to clear protesters from Cairo's Tahrir Square in a predawn raid on Tuesday — the second in as many days — as clashes between demonstrators and police entered their fifth day. Thirteen people have been killed in the protests since the second round of parliamentary elections began on Friday. On Sunday, the United Nations and the U.S. State Department condemned the violence. Gen. Adel Emara of Egypt's ruling military council denied using violence against the protesters on Monday.

Cairo-based journalist Noel King reports on the latest clash between the military and protesters, and discusses where the democratic movement in Egypt goes from here.

Guests:

Noel King

Produced by:

Joseph Capriglione

Comments [1]

listener

Is the Egyptian military which has effectively ruled Egypt for over six decades getting more benefit of the doubt here than local American police being confronted by Occupy protesters who claim inspiration from Tahrir Square?

Why were the warnings about an ultimate confrontation between the military and Islamists in Egypt ignored by the media and their giddy nattering about democracy earlier this year?

Dec. 20 2011 11:33 AM

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