In New Hampshire, Gingrich Puts Romney in His Sights

Tuesday, December 13, 2011

Republican presidential hopeful Newt Gingrich. (Jim Watson/Getty)

Newt Gingrich has seen a stunning reversal in his political fortunes in recent weeks. As the Republican base continues to seek an alternative to presumptive nominee Mitt Romney, Gingrich has soared in national polls. Gingrich's public schedule this week began in the battleground primary state of New Hampshire, where he continues to trail behind Romney in the polls by about ten points. The former speaker of the House and sometimes lobbyist pitched himself as an anti-Washington candidate and promised to run a positive campaign at a town hall in Windham. At a friendly Lincoln-Douglas debate with former ambassador and Utah Governor Jon Huntsman on Monday night, Gingrich showed off his foreign policy chops.

Anna Sale, reporter for Takeaway co-producer WNYC's It's A Free Country, has been following Gingrich around New Hampshire and taking the pulse of Republican voters there.

Contributors:

Anna Sale

Comments [1]

I know this was a Newt story but you treated Huntsman as if he wasn't at the debate. I am a Democrat who wants to see both parties present substantive candidates. After hearing John Huntsman on GPS with Fareed Zakaria this weekend I realized he is the most viable candidate the Republicans have and the one the Dems should fear the most. Next time at least review Newt in the context of the debate. While some laugh at the 'leader of the moment' process the Republicans have gone through so far I think it has all been for the good, weeding out the media candidates and leaving those who are truly presidential. I can't wait for the people to speak and the media to have to start listening and stop living on imperfect polls..

Dec. 13 2011 11:34 AM

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