Occupy Our Homes Spreads Throughout the Country

Thursday, December 08, 2011

housing, house, foreclosure, foreclosing House in foreclosure. (Respres/flickr)

The impact of the Occupy Wall Street demonstrations around the country is difficult to see in raw numbers. But the way in which the national discourse has been moved, and how individual lives have been changed tells another compelling story of the movement's potential. The families in millions of households across the nation who are fighting to hold onto their homes against banks, authority, and the much reviled "1 percent" may have a powerful new ally. Occupy Our Homes, the latest incarnation of the OWS, is seizing foreclosed homes and claiming them for families in need.

The Takeaway brings you inside one of those homes with Brigitte Walker. An Iraqi War veteran, mother, and homeowner under foreclosure in the suburbs of Atlanta, Georgia, Walker's home is being protected by Occupy protesters camped out her in front lawn. Tim Franzen is one of those Occupy Atlanta protesters. He discusses why Occupy demonstrators are taking their fight to people's homes.

Guests:

Tim Franzen and Brigitte Walker

Produced by:

Mythili Rao

Comments [1]

listener

Meanwhile Rep.Barney Frank takes a bow and exists stage left to the applause of the media and the government regulatory meddling in the leading industry is ignored and attention to the President's role in this crisis is diverted.
What role does the deliberate drum beat of misinformation on the housing crisis from the progressive media play in seducing people into taking criminal actions?

Dec. 08 2011 10:28 AM

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