Target Asks Employees to Cut Festivities Short

Monday, November 21, 2011

Thanksgiving typically conjures images of spending time with family, savoring long meals, and watching sports. For those working at the Target corporation this year, they will remain only images. The mega-chain store has just asked many of its employees to put on their work clothes at midnight on Thanksgiving night to prepare for Black Friday shopping. However, many are not looking forward to the extra hours.

Anthony Hardwick is a parking lot attendant at a Target in Omaha, Nebraska. He started a petition to ask Target to rethink their Black Friday plans. Hardwick is formerly a senior level security specialist and trainer at Target.

Comments [8]

Hugo in NYC from New York

The Black Friday phenomenon has gotten out of control. My large company operating in all 50 states now treats it as a paid holiday, which means anyone working that day gets double time rather than a two day closure. I'm not going to complain about the extra pay. Still, the same company does not give do the same for either Columbus Day and Veterans' Day, which are legal national holidays.

Nov. 21 2011 12:11 PM
Anne from Mukilteo, WA

We have begun to speak out against the corporation with our decision to not bank at Bank of America because of their desire to make more on debit cards. We can continue to speak out against the extreme corporate greed by boycotting Target and other stores that feel the need to open doors so early. We have the power to stop the craziness of mass consumption and greed but only if we make the choice. Do not shop until the sun comes up.

Nov. 21 2011 09:58 AM
Jose from Miami, FL

We hear and worry everyday about unemployment in the U.S. If you work in retail, working the holidays is part of the gig; so for those signing the petition, look at this as an opportunity to bring home some extra money.

Nov. 21 2011 09:44 AM
Maria Weisbin

Re: Black Friday: Shoppers should boycott the whole marketing-whipped-up frenzy of shopping on "Black Friday" all together.
DON'T SHOP ON BLACK FRIDAY! ONE-DAY BOYCOTT OF ALL BIG BOX STORES. If you are so brain-washed that you must shop day after Thanksgiving, shop small and local. No more death-by-trampling at Big-Box one day sales. Stay home with your kids. Or take the family to a museum or park. Eat left-overs. A way better present to your family and yourself.

Nov. 21 2011 09:33 AM
Chris from Pittsburgh

Really? We need to clamor each other post-tryptophan for the latest Tickle-me-Squarepants of Warcraft? Really?

Nov. 21 2011 09:24 AM
Elaine from Southfield, Michigan

I'm always way too busy to go shopping on Thanksgiving or the day after. There is food shopping before, food prep, and clean up of the big feast. Maybe the others who come to the feast have time to go shopping, but not me!

Nov. 21 2011 09:11 AM
Gurukarm from Massachusetts

I signed Mr. Hardwick's petition last week when I first heard of it. I think it's wrong and just insane for corporations to make their employees give up their holiday - and for what? a few more dollars in the corporate coffers? I urge everyone to boycott and NOT shop on Thanksgiving, or at midnight or 1 am. And, Target is not the only one - here in New England, popular discount chain Ocean State Job Lot has posted on their website that they intend to be open all day Thanksgiving, 8 am to midnight (not all stores; some are prevented by state law. Thank goodness!) Boycott!!

Nov. 21 2011 08:45 AM
Laine from Indonesia

We are expatriate Americans but we always celebrate Thanksgiving. One of the main things I am thankful for is my decision to relocate here in Indonesia, where we are pretty much free from many of the economic woes affecting so many of my friends and family in the US. Since turkey is hard to get, we roast a goat but pumpkin pie is always on offer.

Nov. 21 2011 07:03 AM

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