Nicholas Kristof: The Future of Occupy After the Evictions

Wednesday, November 16, 2011

An officer guarding Zuccotti Park, minutes before protesters flooded back in, Occupy Wall Street (Stephen Nessen/WNYC)

A New York State Supreme Court judge ruled Tuesday to uphold New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg's decision to evict the Occupy Wall Street protesters from their camp in Zuccotti Park. It was a setback that some worry the movement cannot recover from. Yet, protesters themselves remained upbeat yesterday claiming evictions will only make them stronger. But perhaps instead of quelling the movement as he intended, Bloomberg actually reinvigorated it. 

Nicholas Kristof, columnist for The New York Times, tweeted on Tuesday, "Could #Bloomberg be a secret Occupy Wall Streeter? He seems to have just revived the movement. #OWS." He discusses why he thinks the end of the Zuccotti Park is hardly the end of Occupy Wall Street.

Guests:

Nicholas Kristof

Produced by:

Mythili Rao and Susie Warhurst

Comments [1]

listener

Is it being suggested that the 99 percent have their own top one percent of organizers who are willing to
use and abuse those who have been seduced by the "innovation and excitement" of OWS to become expendable shock troops to provoke a "cracking down" from the authorities in order to advance their cause and "give them the huge boost they needed"?
Have the "imaginative approaches" of political agit-prop (agitation-propaganda) been demonstrated in recent weeks with the help of the media to manipulate facts and emotions with political sophistry and thus deliberately misleading and misinforming the general public?

Nov. 16 2011 11:48 AM

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