Rick Perry Wants Congress to Work Part-Time

Wednesday, November 16, 2011

Texas Republican Gov. Rick Perry speaks to supporters on Election Night. (Ben Sklar/Getty)

Texas Governor and Republican presidential candidate Rick Perry announced a proposal Tuesday that has been circulated for years in chain emails: cut Congressional pay. It's part of what he calls his plan to "uproot and overhaul Washington." In addition, Perry wants to end lifetime tenure for federal judges. The proposal would drastically re-shape the federal government and may be unconstitutional. Takeaway Washington correspondent Todd Zwillich talks about whether this plan is likely to pass.

Comments [3]

Angel from Miami, FL

Perry is probably already aware that the bulk of a congressman's income comes from "other" sources.

Nov. 17 2011 11:46 AM
listener

Just love the sudden interest in the Constitution and the straw man set up and knocked down.
Who said the pay reduction had to done in the middle of a Congress and could not wait until a new Congress?
How about discussing the constitutionality of Obamacare or an administration that ignores Congress when going to war and federal court orders on his healthcare law?

Nov. 16 2011 09:28 AM

This is a terrible idea. One of the problems with Congress today is that the members don't spend enough time in Washington. It used to be the case that members of Congress moved to the Virginia or Maryland suburbs with their families. Their kids went to school together. They belonged to the same country clubs along with their spouses. There was a much more collegial atmosphere. Now members leave their families behind in the district and go home to their districts every weekend to raise money. Because they don't know each other outside the halls of congress they are less able to compromise and get things done.

Nov. 16 2011 07:24 AM

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