One Year Later, A Look Back at the Chilean Miners

Thursday, October 13, 2011

Relatives of miner Carlos Barrios react after he was brought to surface from the San Jose mine, near Copiapo, Chile, on October 13, 2010. (Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty)

This time last year, 33 miners who had been trapped underground for 68 days in Chile were finally rescued. People in Chile and around the world watched as their rescue played out on televisions, radio and the internet. The whole event raised many questions, about what it means to be Chilean, what it's like to be trapped in a mine, and where the miners would go from here.

Produced by:

Alex Goldmark

Comments [2]

Angel from Miami, FL

I agree with "listener". With a treasure trove of career choices open to these miners they have chosen this hard life underground that would otherwise endanger the lives (for lack of a better word) of expensive mining robots. These guys put themselves in harm's way so that shareholders don't have to worry about what research and development into modernizing the industry would do to their dividends and holdings. Way to go "listener"! You're putting the good of the many over the safety of the few.

Oct. 13 2011 10:06 AM
listener

Of course no mention in your report of how the profound Catholic faith of the miners sustained them during the ordeal or how American support from NASA and US drill manufactures (corporations) helped bring the happy conclusion to this crisis.

Rather than avoid politics and religion it seems nationalism and faith raised their spirits carried them through this awful experience.

Oct. 13 2011 08:36 AM

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