UN Reports Abuse at Afghan Prisons

Tuesday, October 11, 2011

Afghanistan National Army (ANA) soldiers stand guard close to the perimeter wall of the Kandahar prison on April 25, 2011 (STR/AFP/Getty)

Detainees in prisons run by the Afghanistan National Police and the country's intelligence service are routinely abused and subjected to what a new report from the United Nations refers to as "systematic torture." The report details repeated beatings, electric shocks, the use of stress positions and the threat of sexual assault. It is unknown whether American officials were aware of or complicit in the abuse.

And here to explain what the implications these revelations are going to have on U.S.-Afghan relations is 

Fotini Christia, assistant professor of political science and member of the security studies program at MIT, explains what these revelations mean to U.S.-Afghan relations. Georgette Gagnon, director of human rights for the United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan, responds to the report's findings.

Guests:

Fotini Christia and Georgette Gagnon

Produced by:

Hsi-Chang Lin

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