Occupy Wall Street Continues to Grow in Fourth Week : Slideshow

Monday, October 10, 2011

Ben Johnson/WNYC
Two occupiers share a sleeping bag in the predawn hours.
Ben Johnson/WNYC

Police keep a watchful eye over the park at all hours. Protester Brandon Hunt, who works as part of Occupy Wall Street's volunteer security force, said that the relationship between occupiers and police was friendly in Zuccotti Park, though during marches and other planned action they often became more contentious. 

Ben Johnson/WNYC

During the night protesters sleep, but their signs, and their art, don't, forming a sort of moat of expression around the group.

Ben Johnson/WNYC

In a very "New York" interaction, some food cart owners have set up shop around the park, and early-rising occupiers are giving them business. 

Ben Johnson/WNYC
Sunrise at Zuccotti park.
Ben Johnson/WNYC
A protester begins to create a more timely protest sign for Monday's activities.
Ben Johnson/WNYC

Nearly 650 people spent the night in Zuccotti Park Sunday. The number of sleepovers--the largest of the movement's three-week history thus far--was given by an organizer named Jacob, who with two others walks through the park every morning clicking away on small counters. The three people meet afterwards each morning and compare numbers to come up with an average. 

Ben Johnson/WNYC
"Good Morning."
Ben Johnson/WNYC

Breakfast at the camp's all-volunteer kitchen gets underway. On the menu: various forms of bread in various states of freshness, regular and "NOT VEGAN!" cereal, peanut butter and jam. 

Ben Johnson/WNYC

While populated by mostly young people, the the Occupy Wall Street protests also take cues from earlier movements: this man sits next to a painting of Beatle John Lennon and a popular slogan and quote usually attributed to Ghandi, though it's origins aren't immediately clear. 

Ben Johnson/WNYC

On Sunday, OWS protesters marched around a paper machet replica of the Wall St. bull with a sign that said "False Idol." This large creation, a megaphone which will likely be completed Monday, appears to represent a commentary on the fact that amplification is not allowed in the park.  

Ben Johnson/WNYC
As the morning progresses, signs go from the ground into protesters hands.
Ben Johnson/WNYC

A statue in Zuccotti Park, of a man in a suit opening his briefcase, has also been "occupied."

Ben Johnson/WNYC

As other New Yorkers make their crowded morning commute through lower Manhattan, many will pass by the protesters. A man from Veterans for Peace gives a cheerful "hello" to many who pass his corner of the park.