First Take: Aid for Haiti, Reimagining the Workday, Girl Scout Cookies and Bacon

Tuesday, March 30, 2010 - 12:29 PM

An aerial view of the UN headquarters in Haiti shows the devastation caused by Haiti's 7.0 magnitude earthquake. (Getty Images)

Anna Sale back on the dayside producing shift.

I'm just back from a week reporting at a hospital in rural Haiti, where one question kept coming up from patients and local residents alike: what's next for Haiti? There weren't a lot of answers where I was, but tomorrow in New York, representatives from Haiti, the United Nations, United States, and several other nations will discuss their plans to spend $34 billion there over the next 10 years. We're reaching out to reporters and international development experts to see what the latest thinking is on where the effort should start, and who will be in charge.

Also tomorrow, The White House is holding a forum on an issue dear to many workers’ hearts: workplace flexibility. President Obama says millions of women and men struggle to balance jobs with family needs. He’s convening this forum of CEOs, small business owners and labor leaders to look at how to make the workplace more flexible. Do you think we should be able to make our own hours if we get the same work done? If you’re in business, would this hurt your bottom line? Let us know.

After our chat with Education Secretary Arne Duncan this morning, we continue our Getting Schooled series with a look at how technology is changing American classroomsFast Company's Anya Kamenetz will join us, and we'll hear from an award-winning teacher about what really works in the classroom and where the promise of high-tech gadgets falls short.

Finally, in our weekly conversation about food, it's Girl Scout Cookie time! Kim Severson and Melissa Clark will share a few recipes that put a new spin on those trusty Thin Mints, Samosas, and Trefoils. One of them involves bacon. You won't want to miss this.

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