'Don't Shoot': David Kennedy on Ending Violence in Inner-City America

Thursday, September 29, 2011

Gang violence erupted in cities across the country in the late 1980s and early 1990s, and the youth homicide rate skyrocketed along with the crack epidemic. The government attempted to solve the problem by pouring money into strict policing programs, but while the incarceration rate soared, gang members still murdered each other in the streets. The problem seemed unsolvable until a method called Operation Ceasefire took root, an anti-violence strategy that held entire gangs accounted at group forums for any violence that occurred.

David Kennedy is the brains behind Operation Ceasefire and author of the new book, "Don’t Shoot: One Man, A Street Fellowship, and the End of Violence in Inner-City America."

Guests:

David M. Kennedy

Produced by:

Jillian Weinberger

Comments [1]

Janice Hardy from Washington DC

My name is Janice Hardy i live in Washington DC on May 9TH i was a victim of multiple gunshot wounds i was shot 6x by a 15yr old boy 1 of the bullets shot my left pinkie finger off 1 bullet was pressing on my Spine L1 i had no feeling in my legs i went through surgery May 11TH the bullet was successfully removed by the grace of GOD & Dr. Gary Dennis at Howard University Hospital i started intense therapy there after i was transferred to Washington Hospital Rehab from the grace of GOD i regain my ability to walk again. I never felt any hatred for the teen actually i felt sorry for him! I dont no if this is crazy but i would like to sit down & ask him why that would never happen because he was in another incident & unfortunately he got 76yrs in prison. It is a shame how many young teens are in prison it has to be a stop with them & the violence.

Oct. 25 2011 02:41 AM

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