Obama Adopts Sterner Stance on Deficit Reduction Plan

Tuesday, September 20, 2011

President Barack Obama speaks in the Rose Garden at the White House in Washington on September 19, 2011. (Getty)

Faced with an uphill reelection battle and a disenfranchised base, President Obama indicated on Monday that he plans on taking a harder line against an anti-tax GOP. In a speech introducing his debt reduction plan yesterday, Obama vowed to veto any plan Congress sends him that does not raise taxes on the wealthy and corporations while cutting Medicare benefits. "I will not support any plan that puts all the burden for closing our deficit on ordinary Americans," Obama said. Obama's plan, which will reduce annual deficits up to $4 trillion over 10 years, has been assailed as "class warfare" by Republicans.

Jonathan Chait, columnist at New York Magazine and author or "The Big Con: Crackpot Economics and the Fleecing of America," talks about whether the president's tonal shift is enough to convince Americans that he's a strong leader.

Guests:

Jonathan Chait

Produced by:

Jen Poyant

Comments [1]

listener

Sorry to disappoint freedom loving "progressives" but we do not have a king in this country and the President cannot force the Congress to pass more failed policies for his own political gain. Obama actually had that for two solid years with a Democrat Congress and we are living with the ruinous result today.

The President offered a "ridiculously generous deal" last summer with the emphasis on the word "ridiculous". He says "pass this bill now" but there is no bill to pass, just a speech. As the CBO said "we don't estimate speeches" but apparently many in the media do and are prepared to sign on the dotted line when besotted with a a charismatic leader and never mind the fine print.
Polls? How about that poll last November called the mid-term elections when the public responded to the reckless spending of the Democrat controlled Congress and state houses?

Isn't that US Constitution annoying by not allowing a "fighting President" but an executive with limited powers?
Shouldn't the public question a doctor who proscribes leeches and journalists who accept unproved declarations from a national leader with a failed record who they now want to endow with extraordinary powers over other branches of government?

Sep. 20 2011 09:34 AM

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