Boehner's Jobs Speech Looks to the Private Sector

Friday, September 16, 2011

Speaker of the House John Boehner (R-OH) participates in a news conference at the U.S. Capitol (Mark Wilson/Getty)

House speaker John Boehner made his own speech about jobs yesterday, to the Economic Club of Washington. In his speech, Boehner said, "The president’s proposals are a poor substitute for the pro-growth policies that are needed to remove barriers to job creation in America ... the policies that are needed to put America back to work," and stressed the importance of the private sector in generating jobs.

Takeaway Washington correspondent Todd Zwillich analyzes the politics behind Boehner's speech.

Comments [1]

sbanicki from Michigan

The Republicans claim business is over regulated and over taxed. The fact is that small business is improperly regulated and improperly taxed. Fuhrer, no politician who wants to keep their job is going to say that prior and existing regulation of the banking industry and wall street did a good job during the sub-prime fiasco.

Republicans preach that small business is the creator of jobs and yet they do mothing to assure that anti-trust laws are enforced to protect small business from big business. The Democrats are guilty of the same thing,; however, this gives the Republicans no cover when looking out for the job creation machine.

Yes, the tax code needs to be revised and yes some regulations need to be eliminated.

Obama's stimulus is just that; an attempt to get the private sector going again by putting more money in the hands of the consumer by giving them jobs that will result in business gearing up to meet the demand for more consumer goods.

The side benefit is we upgrade our infrastructure so we are more productive in the future. We must spend wisely. Money is cheap right now and there is an excess supply of labor. http://bit.ly/p2SaCb

Sep. 16 2011 09:54 AM

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