Study Says SpongeBob Ruins Attention Spans

Tuesday, September 13, 2011

For the past decade, "SpongeBob SquarePants" has been one of the highest rated children's television programs. The show, which centers on a cheerful sea sponge who this in a pineapple on the ocean floor, has become popular with both adults and children, but that may not be a good thing. A new study out yesterday says that the cartoon has an immediate and detrimental impact on kids' attention spans. Is SpongeBob really that bad for kids?

Jeanne Sager, staff writer at CafeMom's "The Stir," says the answer is obvious.

Guests:

Jeanne Sager

Produced by:

Susie Warhurst

Comments [4]

ninonimo

spongbob is ok sometimes. but, for me it could relly mess up your brian and it could tech you how to say wrong things.
so please dont let your kids or anyone watch spongbob

thanks

Mar. 10 2012 11:55 AM
Blake from Home

Spongebob isn't the same 10 yr ago. I woke up this mourning, and seen some nasty scenes with my sister. One scene where mr. crabs saying "Get that thing away from me," then bumps cover his entire body. Another where Sponge reaches his hand toward a metal chamber, and spider looking worms shot out and ate his arm until bone. Nasty and Trifling! It had me itching all mourning. One thing hasn't change. It messing up everybody mind mentally and intelligently. The show is dumb and ignorant.

Oct. 08 2011 11:01 AM
Lauren from IDK :P

WHATEVER! THIS IS THE BIGGEST LOAD OF CRAP I'VE EVER HEARD! I AM #1 IN MY CLASS AND I'VE BEEN WATCHING SPONGEBOB SINCE I WAS A BABY. DON'T DISS THE SPONGE!

Sep. 17 2011 06:24 PM
Sarah E.

I think this is a bunch of fluff.

I have been watching Spongebob since it came out. In fact, I'm watching it right now with my two kids. I don't have any issues with my attention span, nor do my kids.

I think there is much more to blame for the attention problem of today's youth.

For the record, the Stir writer's opinion holds no worth for me. Have you read the articles on the Stir?

Sep. 13 2011 01:14 PM

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