Baha'i Scholars Await Trial in Iran

Tuesday, September 13, 2011

Eight members of the Bahai'i religious minority are awaiting trial in Iran, after organizing the Baha'i Institute for Education, a place where dismissed professors teach Baha'i youth as volunteers. The Iranian government recognizes the Baha'i community as a political organization, rather than a religious group, and declared the center illegal.

Mahtab Farid's father is one of the eight imprisoned Baha'i schools in Iran. His trial will begin on September 25.

Guests:

Mahtab Farid

Produced by:

Jen Poyant

Comments [3]

Jerry Langlois from Bradenton Fl

Greetings,the work that the educators and the Bahai"s are doing worldwide is remarkable,keep on with this wonderful work,the day will come when Countries more and more will embrace Democracy and The Bahai Faith,then and only then will we see less warring Countries. Thank you Jerry

Mar. 08 2012 11:00 AM
Ziaollah Hashemi, MD

Dear Friends:

Please sign the joint letter written by Archbishop, Desmond Tutu, Peace Prize Recipient of 1984, & President Jose' Ramos-Hortal President of East Timor, & Nobel Peace Prize Recipient of 1996 on line.

The right to higher education is as natural as the air we breath, as essential as the water to quench one’s thirst, and as God given as the food one cannot live without.
The other religious minorities of Jews, Zoroastrians, and Christians were allowed to attend universities after the Islamic revolution of Iran in 1979, but Baha’is were not. So, Baha’is have founded the Baha’i Institute of Higher Education (BIHE) since 1987. The BIHE is in the most informal settings of private homes, relies on no state funds, and university professors instruct students in college level writing, dentistry, and alike voluntarily. No credit or diploma is granted. How this most descent enterprise which put no burden on state or society be illegal?

What does justify sentencing seven of these professors to years in the notorious Evin Prison, chastising the students, and threatening to confiscated the homes used as classrooms?

I hope that the influence of public awareness to not only release these professors, but also, encourage other scholars to join the BIHE. I believe that these students should be granted the right to attend universities and after taking the related exams honored credits for their works at BIHE.
May eventually, the largest Iranian minority, the Baha’is, work shoulder to shoulder with other Iranian, and people from around the world to "carry forward an ever advancing civilization" as it dates back 2500 years to the Cyrus the Great in Iran!

Schplars for Peace in the Middle East (SPME), is an independent , not-for-profit, grass root organizationof nearly 55,000 university and college professors, researchers, administrators, teachers, librarians, and students on more than 3,500 campuses worlswide, have issued a similar letter.

I am hoping that you consider signing the letter and encourage your friends to do the same, as you have seen in the 2011 News around the world, there is strength in numbers!

To see the letter and to sign please type "educationunderfire in any search engine and go to Laureates' Letter."

Thank you very much for time. Have a great day!

Respectfully yours,

Jan. 02 2012 09:52 AM
wrigh

for more concret clarification on what this is all about:
1. the website for The Bahá'í Institute for Higher Education (BIHE)
http://www.bihe.org/

2. some aditional info on global awarenes through a very intersting campagne
http://can-you-solve-this.org/de/

3. a real reflection on what the bahai faith internationally is all about
http://www.bahai.org/

Sep. 17 2011 11:56 AM

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