Assessing Terror Threats 10 Years After 9/11

Monday, September 12, 2011

Federal authorities are still on alert after news of a "specific, credible" terrorist threat for New York City and the District of Columbia broke on Thursday night, as the tenth anniversary of September 11 approached. The memorial service at Ground Zero still went on as promised Sunday, with thousands of people coming to the site to pay tribute to those who died and those who survived in the 9/11 attacks. Meanwhile, on Saturday the Taliban took credit for a suicide bomb attack on NATO forces in eastern Afghanistan, injuring at least 80 people.

Larry Korb, senior fellow at the Center for American Progress, and former assistant secretary of defense under the Reagan administration, talks about whether Americans should still fear another terrorist attack.

Guests:

Larry Korb

Produced by:

Hsi-Chang Lin

Comments [2]

listener

The guest's analysis is heavily diluted with the usual left-wing tropes and sophistry therefore worthless.

The "crippling deficit" was nearly quadrupled by Speaker Pelsoi's Congress and it is easily debateable if the cost of the wars had any significant cause to the current economic quagmire.
Government interference in the mortgage industry and Pelosi and Obama's massive spending is a more likely cause.
It is also likely that the first fair elections in the influential nation of Iraq help encourage the democracy movements in the middle-east and "secret prisons" and Gitmo helped prevent attacks and was key to finding OBL.

Sep. 12 2011 09:26 AM
Ed from Larchmont

There are four stolen vans out there still. If the terrorists were to bomb buildings, I think they would bomb the UN and the White House: both are supporting anti-life measures, though that's not why they would bomb them.

Sep. 12 2011 08:02 AM

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