The United States of Europe?

Tuesday, September 06, 2011

As the financial crisis in the euro zone has continued to spiral in recent months, Europe may be moving closer centralizing coordination of debt and spending policies. Some global financial officials are endorsing a central European financial authority, with powers to tax, issue bonds, and approve budgets, as a way to combat inefficiencies in dealing with economic strife. Such a change could make Europe's 17-nation economic union into a sort of United States of Europe.

Louise Story, Wall Street and finance reporter for The New York Times, says it is not an entirely popular idea with voters and the process would be extremely slow.

Guests:

Louise Story

Produced by:

David J Fazekas

Comments [3]

nick alexandropoulos

http://alexfoundationunitedstatesofeurope.wordpress.com

Jan. 12 2013 10:36 AM
Angel from Miami, FL

A United States of Europe can work ONLY if each country is divided up by provinces. Each province, not country, would become a state. Because people tend to be grouped by region, this would allow better representation in the central government and provide a state congress/governor. Current squabbles over sovereignty and language acceptance would become null. States can better diversify between agriculture and industry and not drag down the entire country due to low yields in productivity. Folks would identify with their state rather than with their former nationality.

Only school kids will complain - nobody wants to memorize all those state names and capitals.

Sep. 07 2011 10:36 AM
listener

So the EU tries to copy American success while America today tries to copy European failure?
A "united Europe" was not just a "dream" in the 1960's and 1970's but also in the 1930's and 1940's.
The EU is an example of a government in search of a people instead of the other way around.

Sep. 06 2011 08:30 AM

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