Unemployment Rate Remains at 9.1 Percent for August

Friday, September 02, 2011

No new jobs were added to the economy in August, far below forecasts expecting a net gain of 60,000 jobs. The unemployment rate remains at 9.1 percent. The jobs figures are the latest in a string of dismal economic news, including the downgrading of the U.S.'s tripple-A credit rating, volatility in the stock market, and the ongoing European debt crisis. Though economists believe the U.S. will avoid a double-dip recession, many point to the toxic atmosphere in Congress as a hindrance to economic growth.

Louise Story, Wall Street and finance reporter for The New York Times, analyzes these new numbers.

Guests:

Louise Story

Comments [3]

Ann

Corporations are normalizing unpaid overtime and too often laying off one employee and requiring another to do the work of two. The same work effort is being accomplished by fewer people working harder and longer and often with lower wages -- while the gap between low and high paying positions is widening. Legislating for a true 40 hour work week with paid over time or shrinking the work week to 35 hours and/or expanding employee vacations to 4+ weeks a year would produce more jobs, reduce unemployment, de-stress the country, as well as free more time for children with both parents working.

Sep. 02 2011 11:27 PM
listener

"..many point to the toxic atmosphere in Congress as a hindrance to economic growth.."

The obvious partisan blame shifting to the 9 month Republican House that has actually presented economic reforms fools no one anymore. What about the truly toxic Democrat Congress for four years that caused this debt crisis along with the total lack of leadership in this administration? This ham-handed spinning is getting laughable.

Sep. 02 2011 10:06 AM
michael gonyea

Celeste seems to me to be less shrill and more fun than her former self. Grumpy John on the other hand should take an extended vacation.

Sep. 02 2011 09:55 AM

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