Today's Takeaway: Steve Jobs Resigns from Apple

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Thursday, August 25, 2011

Steve Jobs Resigns; Without Steve Jobs, What's Next for Apple?; Libya Moves Forward After Gadhafi; Pro-Gadhafi Fighter Put Up Resistance in Sirte; Legendary Basketball Coach Diagnosed with Alzheimer's Disease; Who Controls Gadhafi's Weapons?; Libya Faces Steep Humanitarian Challenges; The Changing Face of America's Independent Voters; North Carolinians Prepare as Irene Continues Northward; Robin Wright on "Rock the Casbah"

Top of the Hour: Steve Jobs Leaves Apple, Morning Headlines

Chief Operating Officer Tim Cook a 13-year veteran of Apple is taking over for co-founder Steve Jobs as Apple's CEO. Cook has been running Apple's day-to-day operations since January when Jobs went on medical leave. Jobs was diagnosed with a rare form of pancreatic cancer in 2004. He announced his resignation in a letter yesterday. Apple's shares fell more than 5 percent in after-hours trading on the news. 

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Steve Jobs Resigns as CEO of Apple

Apple announced last night that Steve Jobs, co-founder and chief executive of the company, would immediately resign from his position. Tim Cook, chief operating officer there, will replace him. In a public letter, Jobs said "I have always said if there ever came a day when I could no longer meet my duties and expectations as Apple’s CEO, I would be the first to let you know. Unfortunately, that day has come." Jobs will stay on at Apple as chairman of the board. Shortly after the news broke, Apple shares fell seven percent. 

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Without Steve Jobs, What's Next for Apple?

Apple announced last night that Steve Jobs, co-founder and chief executive of the company, would immediately resign from his position. Tim Cook, chief operating officer there, will replace him. In a public letter, Jobs said "I have always said if there ever came a day when I could no longer meet my duties and expectations as Apple’s CEO, I would be the first to let you know. Unfortunately, that day has come." Jobs will stay on at Apple as chairman of the board. Shortly after the news broke, Apple shares fell seven percent. 

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Libya Moves Forward After Gadhafi

In Libya, the rebels' Transitional National Council has begun moving some of their operations from Benghazi to Tripoli. The head of the TNC announced that he plans to hold elections in eight months. While plans are under way for a post-Gadhafi Libya, the man himself remains elusive. The Council faces a tough road ahead as the country has never seen this kind of transformation before.

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Pro-Gadhafi Fighters Put Up Resistance in Sirte

Colonel Gadhafi's fighters are still putting up fierce resistance at his compound in Tripoli, and making sporadic attacks elsewhere in the capital and other areas of the country. More than a day after the Colonel's compound was stormed by rebels, a BBC correspondent there says the situation is still precarious.But away from the capital - several other towns are still in the hands of fighters loyal to Colonel Gadhafi. The rebels say they're exchanging heavy rocket fire with about a thousand Gaddafi loyalists on the road leading to the Colonel's home town of Sirte, and are bringing up reinforcements.

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Legendary Basketball Pat Summitt Coach Diagnosed with Alzheimer's Disease

Pat Summitt has had a successful career, leading the University of Tennessee’s Lady Vols to eight NCAA championships. Yesterday, the 59-year-old legendary coach announced that she has been diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's disease. WNBA player Tamika Catchings played for Coach Summitt at the University of Tennessee for four years. She said she was shocked by the news, but, she explained, "When you think about all of the things Pat’s been able to accomplish, a lot of it has come from her determination and she’s had so many trials and tribulations throughout her life, but look at her. You know, she’s still standing strong." Despite her fighting spirit, Summitt's diagnosis raises questions about Alzheimer's disease, particularly because Summitt is younger than most who suffer from Alzheimer's.

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Top of the Hour: Hurricane Irene Hits the Bahamas, Morning Headlines

Hurricane Irene is battering the Bahamas this morning with 115-mph winds. As the Category 3 storm gains strength a hurricane watch is in effect for North Carolina's Outer Banks through the Virginia border this morning. Some mandatory evacuations are already underway. Irene is expected to become a Category 4 storm later today and to reach the Carolina coast this weekend. From there forecasters predict the storm will track dangerously close to the mid-Atlantic coastline bringing heavy winds and rains throughout the Northeast. Deputy White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest says Americans all along the Eastern seaboard should pay close attention to regional weather warnings.

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Who Controls Gadhafi's Weapons?

Over the course of his 42 years of power in Libya, Moammar Gadhafi spent a great deal of money acquiring both chemical and nuclear weapons. The deposed dictator halted his weapons of mass destruction program after the U.S. invaded Iraq in 2003, but large amounts of uranium, as well as mustard gas and other chemical agents remain in the country. With the possibility that Gadhafi's reign may soon end, many are concerned about what will come of his stockpile of deadly weapons. Who will have control over the weapons?

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Libya Faces Steep Humanitarian Challenges

The manhunt for Moammar Gadhafi continues and Libyan rebels continue to clash with loyalist forces. Libyan rebels are offering a $2 million bounty for Moammar Gadhafi, as they move to take full control of Libya. But remember why the US and NATO went into Libya. The mandate was humanitarian; the goal to protect Libyan civilians. They couldn't have reached this point, without aid from the U.S. and NATO, whose forces were originally in Libya for humanitarian purposes, to protect civilians. Is their situation the same now?

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The Changing Face of America's Independent Voters

It's an understood rule of presidential politics: win over independent voters in November, and the election is yours. But who are the independent voters? Many people think of them as white, educated, socially liberal and fiscally conservative. That may be true of some independents, but the group as a whole is changing and diversifying, and now many Americans who are ethnic minorities are identifying as independents. In 2008, less than 60% of self-identified independent were white, according to American National Election Studies.

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North Carolinians Prepare as Irene Continues Northward

Hurricane Irene is gaining strength and traveling north, after pummeling the Bahamas with 115 mph winds today. The Category 3 storm is headed for North Carolina next. As residents wait for confirmation of the storm's trajectory, they are preparing their homes and businesses for the weather. Many local businesses are still waiting until later today to see what path the storm will take, before they board up completely.

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Robin Wright on 'Rock the Casbah'

Historically speaking, when we think of revolutions we think of youth. And in the case of the Arab spring, this is certainly true — one half of the Islamic world is people under thirty, and they are at the forefront of sweeping change. How are their values and religious beliefs similar to (and different from) their elders? And what do they want the future to look like?

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Update on Developments in Libya From Tripoli

The situation in Libya is rapidly changing. We're hearing for the first time since the raid on Tripoli from the man who runs NATO — Anders Fogh Rasmussen. He's been speaking to our partner the BBC. And at the same the British Defense Secretary, Liam Fox, has been weighing in about the help being given to NATO. Not clear at this stage the two are singing from the same hymn sheet. We speak with John Burns, from our partner The New York Times and Rana Jawad, correspondent from our partner the BBC.

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