Iraq, Seven Years After the Invasion

Thursday, March 18, 2010

An Iraqi woman casts her ballot for the country's parliamentary elections March 7, 2010 at a polling station in Baghdad, Iraq. (Getty Images)

It has been nearly seven years since the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq. Today, as the country awaits results from the March 7 national election, we check in with Iraqis about the state of their country. 

It has been nearly seven years since the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq. Today, as the country awaits election results from March 7 primary,

we are checking in with Iraqis about how they view the state of their country. 

 

Lubna Naji (lub-nah NAH- jee) joins us this morning. SHE is a TWENTY FOUR YEAR OLD medical student at Baghdad Medical School.

 

Waria Salihi (pron: WAH-ree-ah SAH-lee-hee) is President of The Salihi Group, a company involved in Iraqi reconstruction.

 

And Adel Darwish is a British journalist and author specializing in Middle East politics. He joins us from London.

We speak with Lubna Naji, a 24-year-old medical student at Baghdad Medical School, and with Waria Salihi, president of the Salihi Group, a company involved in Iraqi reconstruction. We also speak with British journalist and author Adel Darwish.

Guests:

Adel Darwish, Dr. Lubna Naji and Waria Salihi

Produced by:

Adi Narayan and Clancy Nolan

Comments [1]

Adel Darwish from London

The sooner the Iraqis change the electoral law to the system from proportional representation (i.e. lists) into direct constituency system, where each constituency elects one MP, the better. As the current system requires coalitions among party resulting in stagnant situation since government of the day has no overall majority to implement policies promised during election. It will also end the division as people vote along sectarian lines rather than political and economic issues.

Mar. 18 2010 06:37 AM

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