Two Libyan-Americans React to News Out of Tripoli

Monday, August 22, 2011

A Libyan rebel celebrates inside the captured military base, 'Kilometre 27', base to soldiers loyal to Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi, 16 kilometers west of the centre of Tripoli, on August 21, 2011. (Filippo Monteforte/Getty)

While opposition forces celebrate throughout the streets of Libya this morning, many Libyans in the U.S. are greeting the day with a mixture of excitement, anticipation, and fear for loved ones on the ground. Two Libyan-Americans who have relatives who were kidnapped by Moammar Gadhafi's forces in the 1990s join the program with their reactions.

Bashir Almegaraf's father was a Libyan political dissident who was kidnapped in Egypt in 1990, and is now being held in a prison in Libya. He last heard from his father in a letter in 1993. Rashid Al Kikha is the newphew of Mansour Al Kikha, who was a Libyan ambassador to the UN and was kidnapped by Gadhafi's forces in 1993.

Guests:

Rashid Al Kikha and Bashir Almegaryaf

Comments [1]

Diane Richard from Minneapolis

I lived in a rental house in Columbia, Missouri, in 1993, owned by a landlord who I believe was Mansour Al Kikha's brother, Mohammad. "Mo" was so proud of his accomplished, urbane brother, and he had me join them for dinner while Mansour was visiting from Paris. I've been haunted by news of his kidnapping ever since. It was such a surprise to hear of him this morning on the radio. I'd love to get in touch with Rashid Al Kikha, to confirm my recollections. Most of all, I wish both commentators peace and, to use a hackneyed phrase, closure in the resolution of their search.

Aug. 22 2011 01:02 PM

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