Unions Representing 45,000 Verizon Workers Declare Strike

Monday, August 08, 2011

Mike Paleski outside Verizon headquarters (WNYC/Arun Venugopal)

Two unions that represent workers for Verizon announced an immediate strike on Sunday, demanding better treatment after a lack of progress in negotiating contracts. The Communications Workers of America and the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, the unions representing Verizon, last went on strike in 2000. Verizon union membership has shrunk by nearly in half since then, and is much weaker than before. Can union members still exert their influence in a strike?

Mike Carmel, a Verizon customer support analyst who is among the strikers, says they are willing to strike as long as they need to in order to make progress.

Guests:

Mike Carmel

Produced by:

Jen Poyant

Comments [3]

Charles

What an odd way to report on this story; to have a producer record an interview with a Verizon representative over the weekend, and then to "feature" an interivew with a single guest (a member of the striking bargaining unit), in which the guest, aided by the program host, take potshots at Verizon's position in the dispute, via eidted audio clips of the Verizon interview.

Naturally, that is not really "reporting." It is advocacy theatre.

Aug. 08 2011 10:37 AM
Lisa Wilkinson

The general public does not realize that wireless works on the regular telephone network. It is supplied by copper T1 lines and fiber optic cable part of Verizon's core network.

Aug. 08 2011 09:47 AM
Rebecca Hausmann from NYC

I have been with Verizon 29 years. The comments about most of the company's revenue being from the new wireless divisions is a bit of a smoke screen; hundreds of thousands of data circuits (what I work with) are wireline because business does not want their valuable data on a wireless network (think of when you lose cell service, even temporarily). Thus: a vast majority of businesses use the wireline services.

Aug. 08 2011 08:40 AM

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