Michele Bachmann Rises in the Polls; Takes Heat Over Migraines

Thursday, July 21, 2011

Republican presidential candidate Rep. Michele Bachmann acknowledged earlier this week that she suffers from chronic migraine attacks, a familiar problem for the 36 million other Americans that experience them. But some people are now speculating as to whether or not Bachmann's migraines might interfere with her ability to do her job. This kind of talk could amount to a minor setback for Bachmann's campaign, considering some polls show she's the front runner for the Republican bid for president.

Molly Ball, national politics reporter for Politico, has been following developments in Washington and on the campaign trail. Dr. Stephen Silberstein, professor of neurology and director of the Jefferson Headache Center in Pittsburg, explains how migraines work and the latest treatment options for sufferers.

Guests:

Molly Ball and Dr. Stephen Silberstein

Produced by:

Jen Poyant

Comments [2]

Harriett Woolwine from Des Moines, IA

While aspartame (ie Nutrasweet) and sucralose (ie Splenda) are wonderful products for dieters and diabetics, they do cause severe migraines in some people. I was suffering severe, disabling migraines and was fortunate enough to have a doctor familiar with the sensitivity some have to artificial sweeteners. Foods marked "light", "low sugar" and even "healthy" have caused headaches, and then I find out they include one of the artificial sweeteners. Maybe this will help you, maybe not, but I thought I would mention it. Good luck to you, you are in my prayers.

Jul. 21 2011 07:25 PM

Didn't Bill Clinton have heart problems? Didn't Ronald Regan do his presidential duties after being shot?

A woman is less capable of doing the work of the President of the United States with migraines ?

Sounds like a very familiar argument regarding women and their biology and their subsequent, supposed- inability to think without hysteria.

Jul. 21 2011 06:58 PM

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