Where Should Sex Offenders Live After Prison?

Monday, March 08, 2010

Chelsea King, a 17-year-old girl from San Diego, was raped and killed last month by John Gardner, a man with a history of sex crimes. Gardner was previously incarcerated for molesting a 13-year-old girl in 2000, but was let out of prison early in 2005. The case has sparked a heated national dialogue about the strength of laws intended to protect children from sex offenders. And the question of where sex offenders should live has come up in Florida, as offenders there struggle to adjust to society after prison sentences.

We talk with Grier Weeks, the executive director of PROTECT, a national organization lobbying Congress to enforce stricter predator laws. And for a closer look at how legislation is playing out locally, we talk with Julie Brown, a senior staff writer for the Miami Herald who has been covering sex offender communities that have been created in Florida.

Read Julie Brown's articles, "Julia Tuttle Causeway sex offender enclave being dismantled," and "Some Julia Tuttle sex offenders find housing."

Guests:

Julia Brown and Grier Weeks

Hosted by:

Miles O'Brien

Produced by:

Arwa Gunja

Comments [5]

B.N. from Ga

(Dan Gunderson, “A Better Approach to Sex Offender Policy.” Minnesota Public Radio, June 18th, 2007) “Lisa Sample, a criminology professor at the University of Nebraska Omaha, says…

“Misinformation and a lack of information often shapes sex offender policy…Most of the legislators in her study said their primary source of information was the news media.”

In most cases, lawmakers didn’t read studies or reports relevant to legislation they supported.

She says it’s clear most sex offender legislation follows the abduction and murder of a child, and the resulting public outrage.

Few people are aware a child is at greater risk of sexual abuse from family than strangers. If people understood that, they would support more programs to prevent sexual abuse.

In Minnesota, a panel of experts recently completed a comprehensive report to serve as a guide for sex offender policy in the state. One of the report’s authors says the biggest challenge is just getting lawmakers to read it.

Mar. 17 2010 04:31 PM
cfcamerica.org from Alaska

Very good audio file.
Thank you for making it available.

But I must say, you must note, not all who are on the sex offender list are pedophiles and rapists.
Many on the registry have never raped or touched a child.
Citizens for Change, America http://www.cfcamerica.org

Mar. 09 2010 11:59 AM
Doc from TN

The answer as I see it is to look at all criminals with the same eyes towards prevention.
If anyone commits any crime he should be put to death.
A criminal simply cannot change and even seeming small crimes always lead to larger, worse acts.

If we had put this guy http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ottis_Toole to death when he was arrested for loitering in 1964, Adam Walsh would still be alive today.

The only way to prevent crimes is to kill all criminals, and some before they commit a crime. The statistics prove that criminals are often people who have low IQ's and learning disabilities. Rather than risk harm to our Children we should simply execute (legally of course) all people with IQ's below 100 and those with learning disabilities. The stats don't lie!

Mar. 09 2010 11:53 AM
Doc from http://halebobb.com

The answer as I see it is to look at all criminals with the same eyes towards prevention.
If anyone commits any crime he should be put to death.
A criminal simply cannot change and even seeming small crimes always lead to larger, worse acts.

If we had put this guy http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ottis_Toole to death when he was arrested for loitering in 1964, Adam Walsh would still be alive today.

The only way to prevent crimes is to kill all criminals, and some before they commit a crime. The statistics prove that criminals are often people who have low IQ's and learning disabilities. Rather than risk harm to our Children we should simply execute (legally of course) all people with IQ's below 100 and those with learning disabilities. The stats don't lie!

Mar. 09 2010 11:52 AM
LGW from Tulsa, Oklahoma

The harsher these laws become the more dead victims.

Write all the laws you want. They will not prevent anyone from committing a crime, if they are determined to do so. In fact, the harsh laws encourage the killing of a victim, because dead people cannot testify. Unless there is some kind of evidence to direct investigators to the Perp. So, how do you tell who might be dangerous? While nothing is 100 percent in this world, we must concentrate on the most dangerous.

1. The VIOLENT offender.

2. The REPEAT offender.

3. The offender who DID NOT KNOW their victim.

If you notice. The vast majority of these most heinous sexual assaults, fall into 1 or all three categories. We are wasting all the resources on the low to no risk while the predators are hiding in the registry.

This is so simple and so to the point! When people say, "Well, we can't get rid of the register, what do you think we should do?" Answer, if we need a public register at all, and I truly don't think the public has proven that they can handle it, then the only ones on it should be those that fell into the categories above!

Mar. 08 2010 03:18 PM

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