Next Week on The Takeaway

Friday, March 05, 2010 - 01:45 PM

It’s Mary here with your (new!) Friday look ahead to what The Takeaway is up to in the week ahead. Let’s look in the crystal ball:

John Hockenberry is on the move next week; he’ll be in Oklahoma on Monday (home to the Takeaway’s own KOSU), speaking at the Governor’s Conference on Developmental Disabilities. Miles O’Brien fills in.

Later in the week, John heads to Miami, where he’ll broadcast live from WLRN while attending the We Media Conference...

On to the show next week:

MONDAY:

  • AND THE OSCAR GOES TO ... Look for our post-Oscars wrap-up with Carpetbagger blogger Melena Ryzik and TV blogger Delaina Dixon. Melena will give you the scoop on what the red carpet looked like; Delaina will give the reactions from the Academy’s New York City Oscar celebration.
  • REAL GENIUS: All week long, we’ll be talking about what real genius is with David Shenk. He’s the author of a new book called "The Genius" in all of us (read an excerpt here). We kick off the discussion today. Our FAMILY segment will also concentrate on what makes us smart and what doesn’t. With news this week that Baby Einstein videos really, truly don’t work, we ask – is TV EVER okay for kids? What about internet videos? The American Academy of Pediatrics says that no children under two should be watching TV at all – but my one and a half year old already knows how to turn on the tube, and he’d spend hours watching infomercials if I let him. (Then there’s the TV he seems to be watching at daycare, which I try to forget about.) So, what’s a parent to do?

TUESDAY:

  • MOM AT WORK: A few weeks ago we saw this article about how moms are returning to the work force in this recession. We’re going to talk about what this all means for families and workplaces. Beth Kobliner returns next week.
  • GENIUS AT WORK: We continue our week-long conversation about ultra-high-achievement with David Shenk, but this time he’s joined by a real, live ultra-high-achiever in her own right: Sarah Chang, the violin prodigy. She recorded her first album at age 10. We recorded the conversation today, and it ended up being a really revealing portrait of how Sarah Chang’s family helped shape her into the incredibly poised and talented woman she is today. You’ll want to listen.

 WEDNESDAY:

  • THE PROBLEM WITH “PRODIGY”. Ever wonder how a kid turns out to be a “child prodigy”? Ever wonder what happens to them 20 years later? We talk about all this with Josh Waitzkin (who was the inspiration for the movie “Searching for Bobby Fischer”) and our friend David Shenk.

THURSDAY:

  • TECH NEWS: SXSW (that’s South by Southwest) heats up this week in Austin, Tex. It’s a film festival, it’s a tech convention ... Baratunde Thurston joins us (from the airport,headed south!) to talk to us about why we should care and what the big news is going to be.
  • WHATEVER DOESN’T KILL YOU MAKES YOU STRONGER? Ever really fail at something and think, I’m just NO GOOD at this? And never will be? David Shenk explains why you might want to change your tune. John Mighton joins the conversation with his own story of learning from failure – and how he has taught math to so-called “unteachable” kids.
  • PLUS: Novelist and Miami Herald columnist Carl Hiaasen joins us to talk about Florida as a political mood ring for the country.

FRIDAY:

  • AT THE MOVIES: The new movie "Green Zone" is in theaters, and we thought it would be a good time to talk about Iraq war movies. With "The Hurt Locker" at the Oscars (and perhaps an Oscar win by this point), are Iraq war movies cool? Why?
  • DO-IT-YOURSELF GENIUS: Okay, We’re talking about super-high-achievement all week here at The Takeaway. But what does all this mean for how I should raise my kid? How do I make him a better, smarter human? And what about me? Is it too late for me to achieve my genius potential? David Shenk wraps up the week with us, and we’re joined by charter school pioneer Jenny Niles, who will talk about how we can get more kids achieving at a high level.

Tags:

More in:

Leave a Comment

Email addresses are required but never displayed.