12,000 Crack Cocaine Inmates May Have Sentences Reduced

Friday, July 01, 2011

A Commission in Washington has voted to reduce sentences for inmates jailed for crack cocaine offences, in a decision that could affect about 12,000 prisoners. As many as 2,000 prisoners will be able to seek a reduced sentence within the year, provided they can show they are not likely to be risks to public safety.

Natasha Darrington speaks with us. Darrington served 11 years of a 15-years and 8-months sentence for involvement in her husband’s cocaine base conspiracy. Also joining us is Geremy Kamens, the First Assistant Federal Public Defender for the Eastern District of Virginia, who says his District includes 880 people who may be eligible for the reductions.

Guests:

Natasha Darrington and Geremy Kamens

Produced by:

Duncan Wilson

Comments [2]

HOWARD ELLIS

I'M SO GLAD OUR JUSTICE SYSTEM HAS LOOKED AT THE UNFAIR PRACTICE OF SENTENCING DRUG DEALER TO WAY TO MUCH TIME IN JAIL. FOR ONE COCAINE IS COCAINE WEATHER FREE BASED OR SNORTED. WHEN YOU CAN GET LESS TIME KILLING SOMEBODY YOU KNOW SOMETHING WRONG...........THERE'S ALOT MORE ISSUES THAT SHOULD BE LOOK AT AS WELL

Jul. 02 2011 07:07 PM
Natasha from North Carolina

I would like to thank The Take Away for having me on their show this morning at 6:00 (smile). I wanted to add that in 2007 when the U.S.S.C. made retroactive I was released early, and in June I went to Washington, D.C. to testify before the Commission urging them to repeat history. I was happy that they voted in favor of. I've been home 3 years now and I'll be graduating next year with my Bachelors and then going into my Masters program. I am also involved in a business venture with LaJuan Harris to open a non-profit organization to help men and women coming out of prison.

Jul. 01 2011 09:55 AM

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