In Debt Reduction Battle, Where Are the Sacred Cows?

Thursday, June 30, 2011

President Obama speaks at a news conference at the White House June 29, 2011. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty)

President Obama spoke to the press on Wednesday in his first press conference in three months. He said that Democrats were willing to make compromises on spending, and pushed Republicans to "take on their sacred cows" and agree to tax increases for higher income earners and corporations. But the real sacred cow might be in his veiled threat to ask Congress to stay in session through their August summer holidays, if need be.

Joining us to give an update on where negotiations stand in Washington is The Takeaway's Washington correspondent Todd Zwillich. Also with us is Byron Dorgan, senior policy adviser at Arent Fox LLP and senior fellow at the Bipartisan Policy Center, where he focuses on issues related to energy policy. He says that he missed many a family holiday working in Congress—and that the stakes are high to get this right.

Guests:

Byron Dorgan

Produced by:

Kateri A. Jochum

Contributors:

Todd Zwillich

Comments [1]

listener

Where was the compromise for two years when the Democrat Party controlled the government and brought the debt to the current crisis levels despite loud Republican objection?
The Democrats call for serious economic leadership yet did Pelosi submit a budget last year? Has Reid submitted a budget in over 700 days? Was the administration's budget defeated in the Senate 97-0? Medicare is going broke but has the Democrat Party offered any solutions or does it just criticize those who do? Has the Democrat leadership shown a serious effort in the last year to deal with this crisis that worsened under their watch as they lecture their colleagues now about compromise? Thank you.

Jun. 30 2011 11:50 AM

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