Helping America’s 14 Million Unemployed – One Job at a Time

Wednesday, June 29, 2011

As the economy continues to struggle, almost 14 million Americans remain unemployed. More than six million of those have been unemployed for more than half a year. Two weeks ago, we spoke with two small business owners, Frank Goodnight, President of Diversified Graphics in Salisbury, North Carolina, and Marva Allen, owner of the Hue Man Bookstore in Harlem. They weren’t hiring. Carla Emil hopes to change that, with a website she set up in February, OneJobForAmerica.org, which encourages American businesses to sign up to the website and publicly pledge to hire one more person.

Calvin Scharffs, is vice president of Marketing and Product Development at Lingotek, a translation services company in Utah. He hired an executive after pledging on the site. Louise Story, Wall Street and finance reporter for our partner The New York Times also speaks with us.

Guests:

Calvin Scharffs and Louise Story

Produced by:

Duncan Wilson

Comments [1]

listener

How about if the Obama administration "blinks first" and allow small businesses to keep more of their own money and release them from morass of regulations that ensnare their growth and hiring potential? If unreasonable federal laws and regulations were relaxed, would that not help private sector growth in construction and other sectors? The Obama administration launched a 14 trillion dollar debt that must be paid for in the years ahead which creates massive uncertainity. Small business have no idea how they will be punished with unreasonable taxes, fines, law suits and regulations by their government in the next few years so naturally they have frozen hiring. If we are really serious about lowering unemployment than look to hiring success stories like Texas and ask Gov. Perry about the role government should play in small business expansion.

Jun. 29 2011 09:59 AM

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