Wedding Planners Anticipate Boom with Legalization of Same-Sex Marriage

Monday, June 27, 2011

Hundreds gather outside of the Stonewall Inn to celebrate the passage of a same-sex marriage bill. (Stephen Nessen/WNYC)

Now that New York has become the sixth state to legalize same-sex marriage, thousands of gay and lesbian couples will have the chance to say their "I Dos" in the Empire State. And with that announcement, wedding planners around the city are predicting a big boom in business.

Joining us is Nicky Reinhard, who co-founded of David Reinhard Events and has been planning weddings for over 10 years.

 Nicky Reinhard who is the co-founder of David Reinhard Events and has been planning weddings for over 10 years.

 

 

Guests:

Nicky Reinhard

Produced by:

Jaywon Choe

Comments [2]

listener

If we are counting dollars and cents when a state's rights question is settled on same sex marriage then what about other 10th Amendment issues could produce a revenue windfall for the states if the federal government is overruled by the people. These include the issues like health-care, business taxes, education and environmental laws which impact all citizens.
The NY Times article cited concluded with a gay couple who said
“We’re going to invite you to our wedding...Now we have to figure out how to pay for one.”
Maybe that is where those other economic "state's rights" issues come into play.
If today gay marriage can be passed by the states then tomorrow Obamacare, business regulations and oil drilling moratoriums can be defeated by the states. That would likewise be a revenue windfall and an expansion of liberty and economic opportunity for ALL newlyweds starting a life together.

Jun. 27 2011 09:09 AM
Ed from Larchmont

The wedding industry will make money. Are you factoring in the money lost by people not coming to NY or leaving NY as a result of this law?

Jun. 27 2011 07:24 AM

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