Workers Take Low-Paying Jobs As Unemployment Increases

Friday, June 24, 2011

Construction workers at the World Trade Center site watching city leaders giving a press conference. (Stephen Nessen/WNYC)

How little would you work for? With unemployment here in the U-S hovering at 9.1 percent, and the global economy no better off, the folks at The Daily Beast conducted a social experiment to find out just how little money people would accept in order to do some of the most mundane jobs. How about, for example, listening to an hour of someone read Richard Nixon's old Checkers speech ... and having to count unusual words like 'quintuplet' and 'pathological'? Tom Weber, managing editor and writer at Newsweek and The Daily Beast,  joins us now.

Guests:

Tom Weber

Produced by:

Duncan Wilson

Comments [2]

amalgam from NYC by day, NJ by night

Globalized "race-to-the-bottom" for wages, benefits, workers rights, etc. Well, at least corporations are people and they can shed some inanimate tears for those other people out of their employ; jobless humans.

Jun. 24 2011 11:00 AM
Peg

The establishment of the MINIMUM wage at below a LIVING wage is another form of corporate welfare. Businesses get a break on employment expenses, while the tax payer picks up the tabs for the extra social services (food stamps, medical care, rent and utilities supplementation) needed by the working poor.

More and more employers are offering positions that pay below a LIVING wage... and Americans are fighting for the "scraps," while complaining about taxes and the expenses of social programs.

Jun. 24 2011 07:07 AM

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