Congress, White House Spar Over War Powers Act in Libya

Thursday, June 16, 2011

The White House and Congress are butting heads over who authorizes military action in Libya. The 60-day deadline for President Obama to get approval from Congress to go to war passed on May 20th.

Tuesday, the White House offered its first public argument on why the administration thinks it has not violated the War Powers Resolution. The White House Press Secretary said that President Obama’s actions are consistent with the War Powers Act. However, ten members of Congress, led by Representative Dennis Kucinich filed a lawsuit Tuesday, effectively asking a judge to order an end to U.S. involvement in the war.

Susan Low Bloch, law professor at Georgetown Law School, says the president's argument that our involvement in Libya is not consistent with the definition of 'hostilities' in the War Powers Resolution is a novel one and may hold up in court. Takeaway Washington correspondent Todd Zwillich says that even aside from a legal battle ensuing in the courts there will be new battles over appropriating money for our involvement in Libya as the price tag for the war there escalates.

Guests:

Susan Low Bloch

Produced by:

Jen Poyant

Contributors:

Todd Zwillich

Comments [2]

Zadoc Paet from USA

If it's not a war, then Obama doesn't need approval, and I don't see it as a war.

POLL: Does Obama need Congressional Approval to continue NATO operations in Libya?
Vote: http://www.wepolls.com/r/841074

Jun. 16 2011 03:30 PM
Alex K

Obama is firm in his decision, but do you agree?

Vote:

http://www.wepolls.com/p/841074/

Jun. 16 2011 02:55 AM

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