Can Rep. Anthony Weiner Survive the Scandal?

Tuesday, June 07, 2011

Rep. Anthony Weiner (D-NY) admitted Monday to sending lewd photos of himself to women he met online. The revelation came after Weiner denied sending photos of himself, saying that his Twitter account was hacked. In a lengthy and teary press conference, Rep. Weiner apologized to his wife, his family and the media for his behavior. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi has called for an investigation of Weiner. Can the congressman survive the scandal?

Todd Zwillich, Washington correspondent for The Takeaway takes a closer look from Washington. Karol Markowicz, a public relations consultant, political blogger and contributor to It's a Free Country, believes Weiner should step down in the face of this scandal. "There's probably more to this story," she says.

Guests:

Karol Markowicz and Todd Zwillich

Produced by:

David J Fazekas

Comments [5]

Wendy from nyc

Several years ago a friend's husband suddenly and shockingly sent me a number of nude, quite lewd, photos of himself. I was shocked and troubled, particularly as I opened the email at work. He continued to do so and tell me about his affinity for photographing himself. I opted not to tell my friend, his wife, and felt his continuing to send me these disgusting images would keep him from having an affair with someone that might be devastating to his wife, marriage, and family. Ultimately she found out and told me I was "dead to her." I never learned what her husband told her but their relationship seemed to remain sound. Predictably, he lacked the character to contact me to let me know what had evolved.

I was wrong to passively facilitate behavior - but he was very persistent and my intentions to protect my friend from devastation were genuine. I suspect many men participate in such activities and the women who receive unsolicited "personal porn" become victims and as such, are reticent about publicly disclosing such sexual accosts. I supported Anthony Weiner politically and his behavior results in a real loss to New Yorkers who had hopes for his leadership. But if his lewd contact was unsolicited, the context was far more damaging than terrible judgment and extremely poor taste.

Jun. 09 2011 09:38 AM

He should lie low. This will blow over by the end of the week. The situation is exactly analogous to Clinton's Lewinsky scandal 10+ years ago: he may have lied, but only in response to questions that were no one's business but his and never should have been asked.

Jun. 08 2011 02:08 AM
listener

The takeaway of this scandal is to remember that the US Constitution never intended elected officials to have this much power over their fellow citizens because individuals are flawed. The awfulness of his failures should be limited to himself and those who love him. The Congressman voted to drastically expand government power and thus his own power and the power of his colleagues. The fact that he refuses to resign after all this proves how seductive power is.

Jun. 07 2011 11:09 AM
Sam from New York

We expect our congressional rep to be intelligent enough, with decent judgment. But in the congressman's case, it's absolutel disgrace. I want my tax dollars paid to him refunded, since they were expended in such wasteful, trashy demeanor. That may fix the federal deficit as we cut out the waste.

Jun. 07 2011 09:33 AM
drora from north nj

The only reason these stories about congress members and others in positions of power keep popping up must be that many others of their ilk do it also and have not gotten caught - which brings me, a flaming liberal, wish to get rid of them all - not for their sexual prowess(es?) but for being dumb.
I mean, these people make decisions changing my life and the future of the world. But then what is the alternative?!

Jun. 07 2011 07:48 AM

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