Analyzing the President's Health Care Proposal

After a year of hands-off, Obama issues his own plan

Tuesday, February 23, 2010

President Obama released a proposal for health care reform Monday that hewed close to the bill passed last year by the Senate. After watching months of rancorous debate in Congress, the White House is laying out the key points of the proposal in plain language. But will it be enough to get reform unstuck?

The plan would be funded by a variety of sources, including a Medicare tax on unearned income like investments for people making more than $200,000, along with higher fees on drug manufacturers. 

We dissect the new proposal with Trudy Lieberman, contributing editor to the Columbia Journalism Review, and Mary Agnes Carey, senior correspondent for Kaiser Health News.

Guests:

Mary Agnes Carey and Trudy Lieberman

Hosted by:

Todd Zwillich

Produced by:

David J Fazekas

Comments [1]

dick c

In this segment you give the impression that public opposition to this bill comes entirely from Republicans. I'm very much in favor of sweeping health care reform, yet strongly object to the Senate bill. I'm sick of legislation that looks like it was written by corporate lawyers and lobbyists. While the government has taken care of the health care needs of the highest cost groups in the country -- veterans and the elderly, the most profitable segments of our health care system have been in the hands of for-profit corporations who seem to value high salaries and profits over the delivery of an affordable product. I recently looked at a list of twenty-two "health care" CEOs who over a recent 5 year period personally pocketed $18bn dollars. These companies are our problem. They are unwilling to deliver. We need to strongly regulate them, as is done in other countries, and/or create a robust public plan or Medicare buy-in. Politicians who offer anything less are selling out.

Feb. 23 2010 08:54 AM

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