Where Did Germany's 'Supertoxic' E. coli Outbreak Come From?

Friday, June 03, 2011

Germany's "supertoxic" variant of E. coli has infected more than 1,500 people and killed at least 17. Scientists still don't know where the virus came from, why it's so deadly. The outbreak seems to be affecting women more than men, likely because women eat more salads. The strain is also reportedly resistant to 14 different antibiotics.

We talk to Dr. Michael Osterholm, the director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota about the latest in Germany, how at risk our own food supply is, and what more can be done to prevent these kinds of food-borne diseases.

Guests:

Michael Osterholm

Produced by:

Sitara Nieves

Comments [1]

Jeff from MA

Scary Stuff! We've got to keep researching treatments for this. You can find a few other good related stories about the science and research specimen data for these studies at the BioResearcher resource site on facebook, twitter, and myspace: http://twitter.com/BioResearcherDx , http://www.myspace.com/promeddx, and http://www.facebook.com/pages/BioResearcherDx-sponsored-by-ProMedDx/208981725791856

Jun. 15 2011 04:37 PM

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