Anatomy of 'Weinergate'

Thursday, June 02, 2011

The basics of "Weinergate" are well established. Congressman Anthony Weiner (D-NY), has a Twitter account. The Friday before Memorial Day weekend, a picture was posted on Yfrog and tweeted from Weiner's account to that of a 21-year-old college student in Seattle. The picture, as most of the country knows by now, was a shot from the chest down of a man in his underwear. It was immediately deleted. Rep. Weiner claimed, on twitter, that he'd been hacked. Takeaway Washington correspondent Todd Zwillich has been watching this unfold. John Abell, New York Bureau Chief for Wired.com, discusses Rep. Weiner's assertion that "I was pranked, I was hacked, I was punked" and how a person might actually prove such a thing.

Guests:

John Abell and Todd Zwillich

Comments [3]

Charles

I got the impression that Celeste Headlee is not particularly interested in whether Rep. Weiner is telling the truth in his explanation of this strange occurrence. Ms. Headlee seems to be more interested in helping explain and/or promote one version of the events; that someone other than Rep. Weiner was responsible for the posting. And telling her audience that this story is nothing like the (strikingly similar) story of Rep. Chris Lee in the NY 26th Congressional District.

Jun. 02 2011 09:47 AM
Collin miller from 11106

PS: I think everybody on the radio this morning is having far too much fun saying a certain word on-air this morning.

Jun. 02 2011 08:16 AM
Collin Miller from 11106

I am a professional developer, and I feel the incidence and treatment of this story exposes widespread undereducation in basic computer literacy. Computers work in a very few fundamental ways and all these fancy toys blossom from the combination of these fundamental concepts.

If the congressman's car or perhaps his canvas and paint set had been the apparatus of his embarrassment we wouldn't be subjected to such ineffective reporting.

The basic question of HOW to determine whether or not the congressman is directly responsible for the incident is sadly not addressed.

I assume either the reporter does not understand how to determine what question to ask, or the listener is assumed to be unable to understand the question/doesn't care. Or some other case I may have not imagIned.

In any case, it does seem like we aren't doing enough to teach basic computer science literacy. ( the basics have been on the books for decades )

Jun. 02 2011 08:13 AM

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