Visiting Doctors Haunted by Haiti

Tuesday, February 16, 2010

Dr. Steven Landau, a family physician from Smithfield, N.C. rushed to Haiti after the earthquake to do his part in the relief effort. He was not prepared for the emotional toll of the experience. He tells us what he saw and how he coped.

Dr. Landau is not alone in how his experience in Haiti changed him. Dr. Jean Ford, a professor of epidemiology at the John Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health also went to the quake-ravaged region and he says the visit changed his life. Dr. Ford was born in Haiti and moved to the U.S. when he was 16 years old.

Guests:

Dr. Jean Ford and Dr. Steven Landau

Hosted by:

Todd Zwillich

Produced by:

David J Fazekas

Comments [3]

Steven Landau

Annie - Make sure he has his creature comforts met. I can send you a copy of my "Do-it-yourself Medical Mission" article, plus other advice. Also, let him make sure that when going out on mission to the field, he checks to make sure all his supplies and equipment go with him. All of it. And take his personal comfort needs with him, including food and water. He may need to use his personal medications and food for the people when he runs out of his usual supplies. For example, I dipped into my chocolate Nutella reserve for babies who didn't want to eat, when I found my vitamin supplies were not brought to the clinic site.

Feb. 17 2010 12:10 AM
Annie from Kalamazoo

Dr. Landau and Dr. Ford,

I have a close friend, who is also a doctor, that will be leaving for Haiti soon to assist in the relief effort. I would like to send him with a few things that he may need while he is there, to comfort both physically and emotionally. Do you have any suggestions for things you wish you had taken?

Thank you for your time.

Annie

Feb. 16 2010 02:30 PM
Steven Landau

Please note that I was privileged to work with the members of AMURT , the Ananda Marga Universal Relief Team, and its Lady-managed section, AMURTEL. They were wonderful people who were very focused on doing excellent relief work and on building a new society in Haiti based on coordinated cooperation instead of the old-style top-down leadership model.

Feb. 16 2010 07:02 AM

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