Authors on the Legacy of J.D. Salinger

Friday, January 29, 2010

J.D. Salinger, author of "The Catcher in the Rye," died yesterday at age 91. The critically acclaimed novel about teenage angst shocked and inspired the world of literature for decades, while its author refused interviews and eventually withdrew to a small town in New Hampshire.

We talk with two novelists about Salinger's legacy and how it inspired them. Jonathan Safran Foer is the author of "Everything Is Illuminated" and "Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close." Frank Portman wrote "Andromeda Klein" and "King Dork," a story based on a character fighting his peers' obsession with "Catcher in the Rye."

"Many readers were created by `The Catcher in The Rye,' and many writers, too," said "Everything Is Illuminated" novelist Jonathan Safran Foer. "He and his characters embodied a kind of American resistance that has been sorely missed these last few years, and will now be missed even more."

Guests:

Frank Portman and Jonathan Safran Foer

Produced by:

Arwa Gunja

Comments [4]

Brooke Stabler from Oklahoma City

If one wanted to create the Holden Caulfield for the modern age it would be simple enough....write of the teenager who refuses to connect....to the internet, the cell phone, the television set. What a misfit that teenager would be! How easy for that teenager to be turned off by his peers who need to be tied to 762 "friends" electronically.

Jan. 29 2010 12:02 PM
B from NJ

Nevermind, it's up! thanks

Jan. 29 2010 11:23 AM
B from NJ

Is this going to be available for download any time soon?

Jan. 29 2010 11:00 AM
JC from Athens, GA

Here's why Jonathan Safran Foer is going vegan! Check out this informative and inspiring video.
http://veganvideo.org/

Jan. 29 2010 10:33 AM

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