Yemen Sees Continued Protests

Friday, April 15, 2011

An estimated three million people are expected to participate in protests in Yemen today. Laura Kasinof has been reporting for The New York Times from Yemen and she has the latest on the protests. Each Friday for the past three weeks, over 100 thousand people have been protesting after prayers. At the same time, there's a pro-government rally that happens each Friday, with supporters bussed in. Is there still possible change for Yemen?

Guests:

Laura Kasinof

Comments [1]

I do believe in the change that is being happened in Yemen. As long as there are conscious Youth holding out in all Change Squares (in which they are camping) in Yemeni cities against the regime of Ali Saleh, I am confident that change is coming. Although the Government of Ali Saleh used and still use violence by live bullets, tear (toxic) gases, and the use of armed thugs for the suppressing of the peaceful demonstrators, but that youths insist on their demands that is the first is the departure of the President Ali Saleh and then he shall be tried of crimes that he did against Yemeni people. In fact, after being a key ally for them, Ali Saleh is trying to complete his lies ,that he created, which deceived the United States (that was supporting him mightily), the Gulf Cooperation Council, and the European Union that Yemen contains al-Qaeda, elements of separatists, and Hothis. As a result, he warns them that Yemen will be taken to the unknown. But through the current revolution, I think they understood the previous lessons and knew that it is one of Ali Saleh's tricks. Finally, I want to tell you that: what is happening in Yemen now is not a political crisis that can be resolved by engaging in dialogue with its parties here and there unless this dialogue provides that the president steps down immediately. What is happening is a revolution by the people who are tired of being persecuted through the regime crisis over 32 years.

Apr. 25 2011 03:35 PM

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