Truth and Reconciliation in Ivory Coast

Tuesday, April 12, 2011

Ivory Coast strongman Laurent Gbagbo and his wife Simone sit on a bed at the Hotel du Golf in Abidjan after their arrest on April 11, 2011 Ivory Coast strongman Laurent Gbagbo and his wife Simone sit on a bed at the Hotel du Golf in Abidjan after their arrest on April 11, 2011 (AFP/Getty Images)

Former Ivory Coast president Laurent Gbagbo finally surrendered to a military assault by president-elect Alassane Ouattara yesterday. Ouattara won last November’s election with only 54 percent of the vote. While Human Rights Watch has accused Gbagbo and his militia of crimes against humanity, the organization has also accused pro-Ouattara forces of massacring over a hundred civilians in a pro-Gbagbo region. Ouattara has promised to put together a commission of truth and reconciliation to look at crimes from both sides. Can he unite this bitterly divided country? Rickard Dicker, Director of Human Rights Watch's International Justice Program talks about the legal issues faced by Ivory Coast.

The BBC's Mark Doyle has been reporting from Abidjan, where he says it's still too dangerous to venture out into the city as fighting hasn't completely ceased. He says that security and the rebuilding of the army is now required in order to bring peace to the country.

Guests:

Richard Dicker

Produced by:

Jillian Weinberger

Leave a Comment

Register for your own account so you can vote on comments, save your favorites, and more. Learn more.
Please stay on topic, be civil, and be brief.
Email addresses are never displayed, but they are required to confirm your comments. Names are displayed with all comments. We reserve the right to edit any comments posted on this site. Please read the Comment Guidelines before posting. By leaving a comment, you agree to New York Public Radio's Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use.